MAGYAR
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EUPHORIA? Stories of a System Change from Hungary

Until February 23, 2020

Euphoria – this is the word that seems to express the most accurately the intense feelings the change of regime in Hungary provoked amongst those who welcomed it. The multifarious contents that this word conveys, relating to the revolutionary vision, the promising signs, and then the certainty and the potentials of the transition, greatly vary from person to person. Was it intense happiness; the ecstasy of freedom; the prospect of obtaining justice; the fulfillment of the desire to join Europe; or artificial stupefaction?

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CAPAZINE – LET’S DANCE

Until February 10, 2020

This year’s buzzword – LET’S DANCE invited photographers and musicians to work together on joint projects. The workshop was focusing on the relationship between the art of music and the photographic imaging, investigating the possibilities of soundscapes, sheet music layouts, montage, re-enactment, intersections in the history of music and photography, and artistic experimentation.

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East of Eden. Rebels in Budapest – Rubi & Lóze

Until February 23, 2020

Photography became exponentially more popular in the 1960s-70s, and although the administration tried to maintain an appropriate level of supervision, not all amateur photographers were required to register, so full control could be exercised only over the actually published works. Sándor Rubinstein and László Sándor were not members of any photography circles, and they did not participate in exhibitions, but this is not the only reason why they were considered “outlaws.” Their images clearly testify to that these two young men embodied exactly what the system was trying to protect its youth from so zealously: nonconformity, deviance, rebellion, things that were considered to be the mimicking of “the West” back then.

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The Photojournalist Robert Capa

Until June 30, 2020

Robert Capa is considered the unique visual chronicler of several 20th-century wars (the Spanish Civil War, the Second Sino-Japanese War, the Second World War, the First Arab-Israeli War, and the First Indochina War) both in the world and the Hungarian history of photography. The Hungarian photographer, who covered five wars directly from the battlefield, made his mark in photography in the course of his tragically short life. His photographs taken in the frontlines and in the heartland brought about a visual world establishing a new school, and he showed the power of images constructed from a deep sense of humanism to generations to come, up till today.